Resilience: The missing link in the new Circular Economy Action Plan

‍RESILIENCE AND THE CIRCULAR ECONOMY

To build resilience to future crises and to support the response to the current COVID-19 crisis, leading institutions such as the World Economic Forum and the World Bank are increasingly calling on governments to look to the circular economy.‍

How well is the CEAP doing on resilience? A scorecard. Request supporting evidence here.

NO DECENTRALISED GOVERNANCE STRUCTURES

By bringing governance systems closer to their communities and by actively engaging all relevant stakeholders to support access and broaden participation, the decentralisation of utility systems and their governance can increase communities’ ability to respond faster to shocks, boosting their resilience in the long term.

LACK OF FOCUS ON SKILLS TRANSFERABILITY

Regions with higher potential for labour mobility–workers’s capacity to be employed in different sectors as a result of skills transferability–will see their labour markets recover faster after a shock.

‍LACK OF SOCIOLOGICAL FOUNDATION

Complex and adaptive systems require managing all environmental and social variables, as well as their feedback loops, to ensure resilience is built both in the short- and the long-term.

MAKING THE CIRCULAR ECONOMY ACTION PLAN FIT FOR RESILIENCE

The EU needs to urgently embed resilience across its circular economy plans.

  • promote a skills-based labour market and promote skills transferability in the context of the circular or green transition. With the instruments and network around the Skills Agenda in place, a stronger focus on developing transferable skills can promote both resilience and the circular economy. These should take equal importance in both curricula and assessment, and can be embedded in ESCO skills frameworks as well as the Skills Agenda;
  • build monitoring and governance systems around slow variables such as culture, values and institutional change. To do so, the EU should first research the social impact of the circular economy with a focus on slow variables. This research agenda should be strongly embedded in the social sciences and political economy and not shun potential controversy or risks. Based on this research, the EU should develop circular economy governance systems that can respond to slow variables as well as the fast variable indicators currently used such as greenhouse gas emissions or job creation.‍

--

--

Get the Medium app

A button that says 'Download on the App Store', and if clicked it will lead you to the iOS App store
A button that says 'Get it on, Google Play', and if clicked it will lead you to the Google Play store
Circle Economy

Circle Economy

3.9K Followers

We empower businesses, cities and nations with practical and scalable solutions to put the circular economy into action.